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Andrew Carnegie

The Carnegie Institution for Science is a private organization that conducts basic research for the benefit of humanity.

Other News

— Dan Rather interveiws Chris Field about climate change. The interview was published by the Huffington Post. more »

— 50 years after the first U.S. president was warned about climate change, it is "the defining issue of our time," Chris Field told attendees. more »

— “This is humanity as a geologic force,” Ken Caldeira tells the New York Times. “We’re not a subtle influence on the climate system – we are really hitting it with a hammer.” more »

Ken Caldeira warns against the use of geoengineering, calls research into it an "act of desperation on the part of scientists." more »

— PBS Interviews Chris Field at the Peru Climate Talks (at 6:30) more »

Read Newsweek's coverage of Greg Asner's forest mapping work in Peru more »

In Memoriam

Jeanette Snyder Brown

 

Recent News

Tens of millions of trees in danger from California drought

California’s forests are home to the planet’s oldest, tallest and most-massive trees. New research from Carnegie’s Greg Asner and his team reveals that up to 58 million large trees in California experienced severe canopy water loss between 2011 and today due to the state’s historic drought. Their results are published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. more »

Elephants boost tree losses in South Africa’s largest savanna reserve

Protected areas, such as nature reserves and national parks, play a crucial role in sheltering wildlife, such as African elephants, from hunting and habitat destruction. But it’s important that conservation managers understand how the vegetation in these natural protected zones is affected by the population growth that is spurred by this animal safeguarding. To this end, new work from a team led by Greg Asner examined the effect elephants have on the woody plant life in Kruger National Park, the largest protected area in South Africa, and showed that elephants are one of the preserve’s leading causes of fallen trees. more »

Solar Energy’s Land-Use Impact

With mounting vigor for combating global climate change, increasing the use of renewable energy resources such as solar, without compromising natural habitats, is a challenge to the traditional model of utility-scale solar energy installations. Such facilities use vast swaths of land for solar gathering and generating equipment. Until now, studies quantifying the effects on land-cover change and analyses of impacts on protected areas near solar facilities have been limited. New work from Rebecca R. Hernandez (now at UC-Berkley and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab), Madison K. Hoffacker (now at UC-Riverside’s Center for Conservation Biology), and colleagues, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, assessed the siting impacts of 161 existing, under construction, and planned utility-scale solar energy facilities in California. more »

Burning remaining fossil fuel could cause 60-meter sea level rise

New work from an international team including Ken Caldeira demonstrates that the planet’s remaining fossil fuel resources would be sufficient to melt nearly all of Antarctica if burned, leading to a 50- or 60-meter (160- to 200-foot) rise in sea level. Because so many major cities are at or near sea level, this would put many highly populated areas where more than a billion people live under water, including New York City and Washington, DC. It is published in Science Advances. more »